Gratitude

At this time of year, our thoughts turn to gratitude or thanks for all we have. Let’s face it, our worst day is still 100 percent better than the days of people in a large part of the world. We have roofs over our heads, are warm and dry, and are looking forward to a big meal with family and friends on Thursday. Those reading this obviously have some sort of technology and access to the internet, so that puts you even farther ahead!

I want to take a few minutes to talk about gratitude for your job. If you are employed, you should be grateful. If you have a job you love, you should be even more grateful. There is nothing better than looking forward to going to work every morning, feeling that you are fulfilled, happy and making a difference. If you have a great team and fabulous coworkers, even better. You must be truly thankful if you have great people to work with at a job you love.

What about those who don’t have a job? A large part of my business is career transition and outplacement, helping those who have been separated from their jobs find new ones. It’s hard to be grateful when you have been laid off or fired, especially this time of year. The excitement and joy of the holidays is difficult to enjoy when you worry about making a living. However, there is a silver lining and a few things to remember.

  • This won’t last forever. You WILL get another job. Maybe not today, or tomorrow, but it will happen. If you have an outplacement coach, it will probably happen sooner. You will survive, you have support, and be grateful that this too shall pass. Look forward.
  • You are very likely to get an even better job. Take a hard look at what you have now left behind. Was it perfect? Probably not. You have been given the gift of finding something better; a place that more closely matches your ideal. Be grateful for that gift.
  • You will find your best friends and supporters. The people who truly care about you will do everything in their power to help you. Reach out and ask them. Accept their help with gratitude.

It’s very easy to forget how fortunate you are, even if you don’t have a job right this minute. If you have a warm place to live, food on the table, and someone who cares, you are one of the lucky ones. Be thankful for today, and have a wonderful Thanksgiving weekend.

Outplacement for the Older Worker

As companies ponder downsizing, they usually look toward reducing labor costs. This means the biggest salaries, which encompass the most experienced, longest tenured employees. You may believe someone with years of relevant experience and great job history would be able to easily find another job. That is rarely the case. In reality, experienced 50-plus workers have vastly more trouble finding a new place than a relatively inexperienced 30-year-old.

Hard business decisions must be made at times, and the reality is that salaries and benefits are the largest expense for any company. When downsizing must occur, that’s where it happens. Logically, the biggest expenses – the highest-paid employees – are first.

We always advocate for giving any separated employee outplacement and career transition assistance. In the case of older employees, career counseling and job search support is crucial for several reasons.

  • Like it or not, ageism is rampant in the business world. Companies use various methods such as graduation dates, years of tenure, or job history to piece together information to estimate an applicant’s age. They assume a person will require more money, a higher title, or will be unsatisfied in a lesser position than previously held, even before discussing these issues in an interview. In fact, many older workers have “been there, done that” and will be very happy, loyal and productive in a position for which an HR screener may decide they are “overqualified” without a conversation.
  • The longer a separated worker is unemployed, the more it costs you, and an older worker could be unemployed for much longer as a result of the factors listed above. Unemployment insurance is a significant cost to any business, and the more being paid out, the higher your costs. In addition, if the separated employee decides to bring legal action against you, your legal costs plus settlement costs can be very high. Those who are provided support are much less likely to bring legal action against a former employer.
  • The emotional cost to an older worker can be severe. This is a person who worked diligently and successfully for many years, had the respect of coworkers and supervisors, and is now separated from what may have been a very large part of his or her identity. He or she has been out of the job market for some time, and will need some kind of support to re-enter.

Many companies offering outplacement will offer only very limited support, such as resume review or coaching for 30 days. Any older, separated employee can tell you that is not enough! A job search for a person over 50 will take longer than 30 days, and that person will need encouragement and coaching during that time.

When making the tough decision to separate your older worker, remember the additional challenges he or she will face and offer an appropriate career transition program. It’s the right thing to do, for the worker and for your business.

Travel or Trouble? Career transition goes both ways

People leave jobs. Sometimes voluntarily, sometimes not. A career transition is always an emotional roller coaster, even if it is the employee’s idea to leave, but more so when the separation is involuntary or when the voluntary separation is a result of job dissatisfaction of some kind.

What happens during that emotional upheaval? An employee leaving voluntarily has some reason for doing so, and will likely share that information with friends, family and coworkers during the transition. A few of those reasons…

  • Better hours – spin that into “I had to work too many hours, I didn’t have flexibility, I couldn’t take off for my child’s school program, …”;
  • More money – the story is your company didn’t pay enough to meet needs;
  • More supportive environment – turns into “I never felt valued, my boss didn’t listen to me…”

Whatever the reasons they have, even employees leaving under their own power can cause bad PR among their friends and acquaintances. If that is the case, imagine what damage a fired or laid-off employee could do! Given the digital world we live in today, the bad news can spread from friends to acquaintances to friends of friends and beyond in the blink of an eye. Stories will be embellished, small incidents magnified, misunderstandings become truth. Trouble!

Be ready when you need to separate an employee with a good career transition coach or outplacement provider. An objective third party can help ease the transition pain and refocus the negative energy into something positive that will help them travel forward into a new position that will hopefully be THE job they were meant to have. Finding THE job will help fade the memories of the past and open new and exciting highways to the future, limiting the trouble that could be caused during the search.

The bottom line is that separated employees who have career coaching or outplacement assistance move on to the next opportunity faster and more positively than those who don’t. If you must separate from an employee, do it in the best way possible – help them travel, not trouble!